The mission of DARC ...

 

The mission of the Dyslexia Awareness & Resource Center (DARC) is

 

To raise the awareness of parents, students, adult dyslexics, educators, law enforcement agencies, employers, and health professionals of Dyslexia -- a specific language disability -- and Attention Deficit Disorder;

To make readily available the characteristics that often accompany Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder;

To provide information, resources, support and advocacy training for parents of children and adults affected with Dyslexia and/or Attention Deficit Disorder.

More on our mission

Statement of purpose


Who We Are

The Dyslexia Awareness and Resource Center (DARC) was founded in 1990 by Program Director Joan Esposito. Her husband, Les Esposito, now serves as the Executive Director. The Center opened its permanent Santa Barbara office in July, 1991. Joan herself was functionally illiterate until age forty-four when she was successfully diagnosed as having dyslexia and attention deficit disorder ( a condition that often accompanies dyslexia). Since her identification, Joan has concentrated her efforts on bringing awareness to the community and to others who have struggled with dyslexia and attention deficit disorder .

 

The Dyslexia Awareness and Resource Center (DARC) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to raising the community's awareness of dyslexia, specific learning disabilities, and attention disorders.

 

The center houses a unique resource library of hundreds of books, programs, and videos about dyslexia and attention disorders. It is extensively used by professionals from academia, the public school systems, social services community, and the medical and legal professional. It is a safe, comfortable environment where parents, children, adults, and community come to learn about these disabilities.

 

Overview

 

Now in its seventh year of operation, the Center has served over 8000 clients and mailed thousands of pieces of information to clients throughout California and the nation. Ninety percent of the clients who come to the center are successfully referred to private resources, social security administration programs, rehabilitation programs and/or educational programs.

 

The mission of the Center is to raise the awareness of parents, students, adult dyslexics, educators, law enforcement agencies, employers, employees, and health professionals about dyslexia and attention deficit disorder. The Center accomplishes its mission by providing comprehensive information and education through workshops, pilot programs, referrals and resources provided free of charge to the public.

 

Board of Directors


What we offer

Dyslexia is not a disease or condition that can be cured. It is a neruological trait which continues through life. However, through individulaized teaching methods, the person who has dyslexia can be taught how to compensate for particular, limiting characteristics. In this way, one can successfully overcome the negative effects of dyslexia.

 

When a person with dyslexia struggles with seemingly simple tasks which others take for granted, they are often mistakenly thought to be stupid, careless, or lazy.

 

Repeated failure to perform at expected levels results in an endless cycle of anxiety, frustration, and shame. This debilitating process can be more damaging to one's performance ability than the impairment itself.

 

Dyslexia continues throughout life. Without diagnosis and remediation, the person with dyslexia risks low self esteem, limited relationships, and failure in school and career pursuits.

 

Our Library

DARC maintains an up to date library of books, literature, video and audio tapes.

 

Advocacy Training

DARC runs workshops for parents in search of educational or vocational help for their children with dyslexia.

 

Networking 

DARC provides a network of state, national, and international institutes, to make the latest medical and educational research available to the public.

 

The Vision and the Task 

DARC hosts an annual conference on dyslexia and related disorders.

 


More About Dyslexia

 

What is Dyslexia?

 

Dyslexia is an invisible disability. It is caused by a difference in brain structure which is present at birth and is often hereditary. As a result, incoming or outgoing information gets scrambled as it travels between the senses and the brain. This condition does not affect intelligence level - yet it does impair one's ability to learn, retain, and express information.

 

Recognizing and manipulating symbols, especially letters and numbers in sequence, presents the most universsally acknowledged problem. Reading, writing, and math, taught by traditional methods, can be difficult if not impossible for the person with dyslexia to master. Poor memory, coordination problems, confusion of right and left, and impaired depth perception are also common attributes.

 

Who Has Dyslexia?

 

Dyslexia occurs in 15% of the population, according to studies cited in the early 1980's by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. More recent studies of dyslexia in adult literacy programs, prisons, juvenile courts, colleges, and the work force suggest that this figure is rising. Men and women from every ethnic group are affected.

 

A growing list of exceptional individuals known to have suffered from dyslexia proves that this condition doesn't have to diminish chances or ambitions. Most people with dyslexia possess average to superior intelligence and many are unusually gifted.

 

What are the signs of Dyslexia?

 

A cluster of characteristics that interferes with one's ability to function in school or in the work place could be a clue to this hidden disability. The severity of these symptoms will vary with each individual. Dyslexia can be identified through proper testing by trained professionals knowledgeable in this field.

 

 

Related Sites

 


Feature Articles.

 


Event Calander

 

Dyslexia Awareness And

Resource Center

 

proudly announces

The Fourth Annual

"Vision and the Task" Conference

 

Saturday, January 29, 2000

from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.

Featuring

 

Rick Lavoie, M.A., M.Ed.

 

Richard D. Lavoie is Executive Director of the Riverview School in Massachusetts. He holds three degrees in Special Education, has served as an Adjunct professor and visiting lecturer at Syracuse, University of Saskatchewan, Manhattanville College, University of Alabama and Georgetown. He has published award winning films related to educating adolescents with special needs. His best known videos include: "How Difficult Can This Be? The F.A.T. City Workshop" and the "Last One Picked, First One Picked On: The Social Implications of Learning Disabilities." His Currently released video on behavior management, "When The Chips Are Down…" is now available through PBS Video. Over 500,000 parents and professionals throughout North America have listened to Rick Lavoie personally deliver his outstanding message. Rick has had distinction of having delivered the keynote Address during the Conferences at the three major special needs organizations in the United States: The Learning Disabilities Association (LDA); Council for Exceptional Children; and Children with Attention Deficit Disorder (Ch. ADD).

 

 

*Morning Coffee, Danish, Break Refreshments and Gourmet Lunch will be served*

 

Cost: $95.00 ( Conference, Material and Lunch included )

 

Place: Santa Barbara City College, The Garvin Theater

721 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, California

****Continuing Education Credits for

Nurses;MFCCs &/or LCSWs; and Teachers Available ****

***** For more information call DARC *****

 

REGISTRATION FORM

 

To pre-register for January 29, 2000 Vision and the Task Conference, compleate and return this form with a $95.00 check made out to DARC Vision and the Task Conference. Conference program and information will be sent to you in mid January 2000.

 

Reservations will be accepted with Visa or Master Charge through Fax transmition. If you wish to Fax a reservation, the DARC's Fax number

 

 

Name___________________________________________

Phone # (____)_______________

 

 

Address__________________________________________

 

 

City_____________________________

 

 

State_____________________________Zip_________

 

 

 

 

___VISA____Master Charge

 

 

 

#________________________________________________Expir. Date:_____/_____/______

 

 


 

Diagnostic Symptoms of

Dyslexia

 

 

CHILDHOOD:

 

 

· Difficulty expressing oneself.

· Delayed learning of tasks such as tying shoes and telling time.

· Inattentiveness; distractability.

· Inability to follow directions.

· Left-right confusion.

· Difficulty learning the alphabet, times tables, words, songs, or rhymes.

· Poor playground skills.

· Difficulty learning to read.

Mixing the order of letters or numbers while writing

 

ADOLESCENCE and ADULTHOOD:

 

· Difficulty processing auditory information.

· Losing possessions; poor organizational skills.

· Slow reading; low comprehension.

· Difficulty remembering the names of people and places.

· Hesitant speech; difficulty finding appropriate words.

· Difficulty organizing ideas to write a letter or paper.

· Poor spelling.

· Inability to recall numbers in proper sequence.

Lowered self-esteem due to past frustrations and failures.

 


Board of Directors

Mr. Roger B. Lytel, Esq.
Lawyer
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

 

 

RONALD B. BROOKS PH.D.
CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGIST, MFC
VICE-CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD

 

 

LESLIE V. ESPOSITO
REAL ESTATE BROKER
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR/DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT

 

 

JOAN T. ESPOSITO
PRESIDENT/PROGRAMME DIRECTOR

 

 

CAROL LARSEN
COMPLIANCE COORDINATOR, ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANCE
SECRETARY TO THE BOARD

 

 

ISAAC J. DORNBUSH
ACCOUNTANT AND OPERATIONS SPECIALIST
TREASURER TO THE BOARD

 

 

SUSAN CHAPMAN
PUBLIC RELATIONS

 

 

F. DONALD FARNSWORTH
Vice president - Investments
A.G. Edwards & Sons, Inc.

 

 

PATRICIA JOHNSTON
OWNER OF BUSY BEE PRINTING

 

 

DOUGLAS LAURENCE
RETIRED MGM PRODUCER

 

 

GLENN E. MILLER, M.D.
PSYCHIATRY

 

 

KRISHAN SINGH
RETIRED REGIONAL DIRECTOR
UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMME

 

 

SID SMITH
RETIRED BUSINESS OWNER
FORMER CITY COUNCILMAN OF SANTA BARBARA
FOUNDER OF NON PROFITS INCORPORATED

 

 


Roger B. Lytel, Esq.

To lead board of Dyslexia Center into year 2000!

 

Santa Barbara, February 15, 1999:

 

The Board of Directors of the Dyslexia Awareness and Resource Center has elected Roger B. Lytel as its new Chairman. Mr. Lytel replaces Krishan G. Singh, who has served as Board Chairman for the last two years. Mr. Lytel is a native of Santa Barbara. He is a member of the California State Bar, Santa Barbara County Bar Association, California Criminal Defense Bar, California Public Defenders Association, California Deuce Defenders, Barrister's Club, Barrister With Inns of Court, Los Angeles County Bar Association, Lecturer and Author. Mr. Lytel served as Vice-Chairman on the Board of Directors of the Dyslexia Center last year and has been a Board member since 1993. He has received the Mayor's Commendation for " Outstanding Service to Santa Barbara", the Governor's Special Commendation, and the Department of Justice Recognition for " Exceptional Contribution". Before serving his community as a practicing attorney, Mr. Lytel served as a former Santa Barbara Police Officer and Investigator for ten years.

 


Leslie V. (Les) Esposito

 

 

Les Esposito is a native of Southern California. Born in San Pedro and raised in Long Beach, Les completed a Bachelor of Arts Degree, in Philosophy, at St. John's College; received a Master of Science Degree, in Administrative Management, from Mount St. Mary's College; and is a Doctorate of Education Degree Candidate, in Institutional Management, at Pepperdine University. Les was ordained a Roman Catholic Priest in 1970 and ministered in the Archdiocese of Los Angeles until 1986. During this time he served as the Vice-Principal of Santa Clara High School in the City of Oxnard, the Vice-Principal of Bishop Montgomery High School in the City of Torrance, and the Principal of Daniel Murphy High School in the City of Los Angeles.

 

In 1991 Les and his wife Joan founded the Dyslexia Awareness and Resource Center in Santa Barbara, California. He served as the first Chairman of the Board of the Center from 1991 to 1996. Presently he is the acting Executive Director and Director of Development for the Center. Joan and Les have given workshops on Dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder all over the country.

 

Les also serves the community by being an active member of the Montecito Rotary Club which he joined in 1991. He has served on the Board of Directors of his Club for six years, has served as Membership Chairperson for four years, was elected 1996-1997 Club President and elected 1997-1998 Montecito Rotary Club Foundation President. Les has served on the Rotary District level as Membership Development Chairperson 1997-1998, as the Dyslexia Literacy Matching Grant Mini-Library Chairperson 1997-1998 and as the Vocational Service Chairperson 1999-2000. Les also serves as a District Potential Rotary Leadership Seminar (PRLS) Instructor teaching courses on Public Speaking. Les is a Multiple Paul Harris Fellow and a Foundation Benefactor.